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Mountain Heritage Circle

Mountain Heritage Circle

 
 
 
 
 
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You are invited to march to a cadence rooted in the past, celebrating the present and anticipating the future. Throughout the day, a number of demonstrations are offered. Ranging from molasses making, blacksmithing, pottery, colorful needlework to basket weaving – questions, from all ages, are encouraged.
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Heritage Crafters

Nanette Ardakoc, daughter of Cherry Corn, is an 8th generation potter in the Brown Family of potters. She grew up watching her Grandfather, Evan Brown, turn on the wheel with her grandmother, Mercedes Brown finished pottery and helped customers. She watched her mother grow and excel in her pottery through her life as she went from decorating to glazing, to mixing clay and finally to making the pieces from start to finish. Nanette studied pottery and ceramics at A-B Tech Community College and worked fro a short while as the director of pottery at the Waynesville Recreation Center. Nanette discovered her love for pottery lies with slab building, coils and stamping. She loves to mix glazes and create new color combinations. Her favorite part is working alongside her mother and soaking up as much information about her heritage as possible.

David Blackwelder lives in Old Fort in McDowell County, N.C. He is involved in many community organizations like the Crooked Creek Fire Department where he is President of the Board of Directors and serves as Safety Officer and Chaplain for the department. He serves as President of the Board of Directors for Davidson’s Fort Historic Park and has served as a Reenactor at The Gateway Mountain Museum, both located in Old Fort. He has been an American Revolution Era Reenactor for 25 years and for the past 3 years has presented the Revolutionary War encampment at the N.C. Mountain State Fair.

Cherry Corn

Since the 1700s the Brown family has been making pottery in the U.S.. Originally from England, the Brown family moved to the U.S. and brought the trade of Folk Pottery with them. Evan J. Brown, 6th Generation, opened Evan’s Pottery in 1964, continuing the family tradition. He then passed his knowledge to his daughter, Cherry B. Corn, 7th Generation. Cherry became the first female potter in the Brown Family. Cherry then passed her knowledge to her daughters and their children who are the 8th and 9th generation. With three generations currently producing, Evan’s Pottery continues to keep the spirit and tradition of Folk Art alive. 828-684-9726 to leave a message

Lena Ennis, Artist
I grew up along the shores of North Carolina’s Crystal Coast and at an early age began learning to draw and paint the world around me from my grandmother, a southwestern landscape artist. She had me involved in oil painting at the age of four. From that early age, I fell in love with the magic of creating three dimension on a two dimensional plane. I attended the School of Art at East Carolina University, became a commercial artist for many years, then a freelance fine artist.
My work has won awards on the local, national and international level. As a member of the Village of Yesteryear at the NC State Fair, I received the Master Craftsman Award in 2014. Creating art carries me all over the United States, painting for myself and teaching others. I cannot imagine doing anything else.

James and Anita Faircloth
James Faircloth has been making bullwhips, Florida cow ships, for about 27 years. His cousin bought a whip and James could not afford to buy one at the time, so he made one. It didn’t work well, so he made another. With advise from a couple of other whip makers and lots of practice, he now makes excellent bullwhips of nylon, buckskin and kangaroo hide. He and his wife Anita, travel to fairs and festivals in Florida, Tennessee and the Carolinas. Anita grows Job’s Tears seeds and makes jewelry with them, as well as assorted rag dolls, church dolls., bonnets, and aprons. James also makes possibles bags and arrowhead necklaces. They are both Florida natives and live near the panhandle town of Bonifay. They are active in their church and community and love spending time hugging their 20 grandchildren.
James and Anita Faircloth , 1367 Hwy 177, Bonifay, Fl. 32425 850-547-3997

Jeffrey Jobe
A native of North Carolina, trained in historical archaeology, with a subspecialty in metals. I am a trained jeweler and a self-taught traditional silversmith. Most of my tools date from the 18th and 19th Century. Many of the tools came from a German Jewish goldsmith who survived the Holocaust and ome from the camp where he was imprisoned. Many of the other tools have been custom made. As a specialist in hand forged and woven/braided metal, I use a mixture of traditional silversmith, blacksmith and goldsmith techniques and equipment to create wearable works of art with meaning, predominantly through the use of modified repousse’ technique I developed in 2002. Other techniques used include hand forged gold & sterling silver, 14K, 18K gold & sterling silver sand casting. From initial design to final polishing, all of the work done is by hand-one piece at a time. There is no mass production of designs or jewelry. No work is licensed for reproduction.
Barking Dog Jewelry Design Studio Thomasville, N.C. 336-287-6067

Nancy Larson has been knitting by hand ever since childhood and collecting antiques for most of her adult life. In 1984 she stumbled upon her first antique sock-knitting machine and was immediately hooked. She began taking the machine to antique tractor-and-engine-shows (accompanying her late husband to his favorite activity); later she branched out into vintage craft shows. Initially she merely demonstrated the use of the machine, but soon began selling the socks, scarves, dolls and other items made on the machine. The machine Nancy brings to shows is the Master Machine made by the Home Profit Hosiery Company, one of a dozen of US companies that manufactured similar machines beginning around 1880. These were for cottage industry, not for factory use(though comparable , more automated machines came to be used in factories at about the same time.) During WWI, the Gearhart Company donated a hand crank sock-knitting machine to every Red Cross center in the US so that women could knit socks to send to servicemen. Today this craft is undergoing a revival, with both antique and reproduction machines on the market. In the real world, Nancy is a retired research physicist, having worked at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for 35 years. She is the proud mother of one daughter and grandmother of two delightful young boys.

Gale Littleton
At a very young age, Gale Littleton liked to draw, and her talent was enhanced by her love for the country. Being blessed to live and work in North Carolina, she enjoys painting many rural scenes there…the mountains, streams, and waterfalls are some of her favorites to paint. She and her husband, Jimmy, often venture down back roads taking photographs as a reference for her to paint. Because of her love for people, Gale really enjoys demonstrating her painting at the shows where she is exhibiting.

Cory Houston Plott
I have been creating pottery as a full time career since 2012. All of my wares and sculptures are made from High Fired Stoneware which is dish washer safe, microwavable, and also oven safe. The clay is purchased by the ton and turned only on foot-powered manual wheels without electricity. After the pottery dries completely, it is then glazed with all original glazes mixed by my hands to specific formulas. I incorporate Wood Ashes into the mixture, which is a technique that was used by the Folk Potters of North Carolina. These glazes are rich in color, glossy and easy to clean. Plottware Pottery is fired in oxidizing atmosphere which helps create the brightest and richest colors possible. I create pottery in such a way that it is truly an ode to the past. The foot powered wheels turn back the hands of time, and my inspiration is strictly derived from historical European Art, Pottery and Sculpture.

Dede Styles (Dorothy)
Born and raised in Buncombe County, I learned to identify common native plants from my mother. Put that together with a pet sheep to provide wool and plant dyes, this made for a natural consequence. As a teacher, I have shared my love and knowledge of natural dying and spinning wool for a lot of years. In 2000 I was juried into the Southern Highland Craft Guild, opening up more opportunities for sharing my craft.



Kaye Allison - Plott Dog display
Marion Allison - Plott Dog display
Nanette Ardakoc - Potter, hand building, wheel throwing, decorating
David Blackwelder - Revolutionary camp site/Davidson's Fort
Curtis Cecil - Blown & sculputured glass figurines
Cherry Corn - Potter
Carole Couse - Quilting -WNC Quilter's Guild
Doc W Cudd, Jr. - Blacksmith
Dogwood Crafters - Dogwood Crafters w/mixed media & demonstrators
Dianne Ellis - Hand braided rugs, hotpads,keyrings,chair pads
Lena Ennis - original oil paintings, prints, NC landscapes-seascapes-wildlife
Anita Faircloth- corn shuck dolls, cooking lye soap, rag dolls
James Faircloth- Braiding bullwhips
Sue Hansen - Traditional paper folding, mobiles,jewelry, kits
Jeffrey Jobe - Traditional silver & gold smithing
Claudia Lampley - Hooked rugs, wool applique,proddy flowerpins
Nancy Larson - Antique knitting needles-The Sock Lady
Donna Leven-Basketry, gourds
Gale Littleton - Original Oil paintings and prints
Qualla Arts- Cherokee made baskets, beadwork, wood carving
Jack Metcalf - Molasses making
Randell Metcalf - Molasses making
Bill Newell - Dulcimer making
Cary Pace - Whittling-Pace's Wooden Things
Junetta Pell - chair seat weaving
Cory Plott - Potter, mugs,bowls,lamps,vases
Carolyn DeMorest-Serrano - Original Ink and pencil drawings
Bill Silvey - Wooden coin banks and gun safes.
Mary Ann - Silvey Rug Braiding
Dorothy Styles - Natural Dye Yarn
Carl Taylor-Scroll saw art using pedal saw, hand turned pens
Cheryl Bell Thompson - Art of stained glass
Randy Vess - Demonstration:water pump ,corn sheller, corn grinder
June Wiggins - Porcelain doll making, buttons, tea sets, nativities
Joseph Williams- Barkberry buckets
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